Micah: Unmitigated

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Archive for November, 2009

Posse On Broadway

Monday, November 30th, 2009

The last few days have gone by quickly and I will try to make this blog go by even quicker. With SalazMeyer in town, I don’t have the usual lull in my day to write. This resort offers a fleeting wireless connection, so this iPod post will have to do. Pictures will be added later. Here is the rundown:

Thursday: After remembering that my guests weren’t arriving until Friday, I booked another night in Konchanaburi. With my extra day, I took a 34 km round trip bike ride south of town, to see 3 hilltop temples. A flat scenic ride along the river and a lot of climbed steps, were rewarded with dramatic views of the valleys and surrounding mountains.

something

something

They had been on my list and I was glad I had the time to check them out.

Friday: Slow bus ride to Bangkok, where I saw an insane number of farang (foreigners). Th Khao San is a strip of guest houses and bars that draw crowds from all over. There is a Pad Thai stand every 10 meters, as well as a funny tee-shirt booth. My place was about 2 blocks off the drag but had it’s own selection of agressive vendors. Met up with SalazMeyer about 10 pm and had drinks at neighborhood establishment. Then we walked around and bought thought provoking upper body clothing.

Saturday: Toured the Grand Palace,

Palace

Palace

then hit Chatachuk market for lunch. More shirt purchases mixed in with 2 pairs of swim trunks for myself. Supper at great local seafood place followed with drinks at Moon Bar (Thanks Emmo).

Sunday: 3 am wakeup to catch 6 am flight to Koh Samui.

inside the flying machine

inside the flying machine

2 hour ferry ride to paradise (Koh Tao).

Koh Tao

Koh Tao

Swimming in picturesque long, shallow, clear sandy beach.

me in water

me in water

Toss in a little frisbee throwing and water side eating, and you have my first day on a tropical island. Finished with stroll down shore and fire twirlers. (cool pics forthcoming).

Supper stop

Supper stop

fire

fire

Monday: Moved to other side of island via 4wd truck, to be beach side and secluded. Amazing place set in small cove. Snorkled most of day, never tried before, spectacular!

the spot

the spot

SalazMeyer depart Friday, so we are debating how/where to spend the other nights. I will hang south for another 10 days and may try to see the western beaches. Feels like a whole nother trip now that I have company. Will try to post again soon, but think that my activities wont change much. Time to get the sand off my feet.
Go Beavers!

Of Monsters and Heroes and Men

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

After one long bus trip, surviving Bangkok’s northern terminal, and then one shorter bus trip, I arrived at Kanchanaburi around 8am. Luckily, my floating raft room was available to accept this road weary vagabonder.

Tuesday: Began with a brief nap in the most comfortable bed I have had in the past 6 weeks. With 2 nights reserved, I settled in and rented a bike to explore stuff. First stop was a temple with caves, about a 1 hour big wheel ride south of town. An interesting site, that had several chambers with Buddha’s and some cool rock formations.

On the ride back to town, I stopped by the Chung Kai Allied War Cemetery. Resting place  to nearly 1,800 prisoners of war, who died while constructing a railroad bridge over Khwae Yai River for the Empire of Japan during World War II. Some of you may know the book/movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai” which tries to depict the brutal living conditions the workers endured.

My next stop though was the larger, main Allied War Cemetery, back in town. It contains the graves of 6,982 POWs, mostly British, Australian, Dutch and Canadians (The few Americans were repatriated). Japan needed a faster and safer way to get supplies to their troops in Burma, which they took control of to cut off China’s supply line. An estimated 160,000 people died during the railways construction, with the majority being Asian civilian workers.

Know as "Death Railway"

Known as "Death Railway"

I later stopped by the bridge museum and then biked down to see the Death Railway. A big tourist attraction, they were setting up for the light show they do this time of year. The center of the bridge was damaged by Allied bombing and has been reconstructed, with only the outer curved spans being original.

The somber afternoon ended with a view of the sunset from my back deck and a stroll through the night market for nourishment.

river

river

boat in water

boat in water

Wednesday: The much anticipated Erawan Waterfalls was on the agenda, and it did not disappoint. A 90 mintue bus ride away, in Erawan National Park, the falls contains 7 levels of  water tumbling over limestone. With a 1.6 km hike up to the 7th level, I was hoping to get away from the European speedos, but they were everywhere. After reaching the top, I made a goal of sampling each one on the way back down. The crystal clear water rolling over the colorful limestone boulders, made for some spectacular scenary. Enough words, let’s have a look at what I am talking about:

level #1

level #1

Level ?

Level ?

In the picture below: The hairy, buff, Eastern European looking man in the falls, is not me.

Level #3

Level #3

Level #5

Level #5

The water was spilling out before I got in

The water was spilling out before I got in

Proudest monkey

Proudest monkey

Although a bit challenging, I have enjoyed finding ways to take pictures of myself. In the picture above, I am imitating the monkeys that I saw near the top level. Except they were throwing things down at the tourist. Carp were the other one of God’s creatures that were prominent. They had an irritating habit of nipping at my legs which made swimming less fun. The only other disappointing thing about Erawan, a lack of clear sunshine spots to lounge in, everything else was amazing.

Another rewarding stop in another breathtaking part of Thailand. The city also reaffirmed a belief I have long held, “SE Asian women love me”. Case in point: just walking down the main street, groups of them standing outside empty bars are calling to me and asking where I am from. I was of course flattered and a little curious, but I found their behavior to be a bit too desperate. I think men and woman should meet in the more traditional way, on the day of their pre-arranged marriage.

Next Up: Meeting SalazMeyer in Bangkok on Friday. ถ้วย ของ ฉัน ทำงาน ผ่าน

Der fröhliche Wanderer

Monday, November 23rd, 2009
The city I am currently in is known as New Sukhothai. Not all that impressive of a place, but it does serve as a fine base for trips to Sukhothai Historical Park and Si Satchanalai Historical Park. These parks are Thailands “Machu Picchu” or “Angkor Wat”, but much less dramatic or touristy. My park adventures shall be laid out before you in this photos montage with a few words sprinkled in.
———
Sunday, Sukhothai Historical Park: A fairly popular stop for people on their way up north to Chiang Mai from Bangkok. I figured Sunday would be somewhat busy, but it was not that bad. The park is a short, cheap bus ride from town, but covers a large area. Almost everybody rents bicycles, which allow you to see all of the site while rolling peacefully down tree lined streets. Brief history: Sukhothai was capitol of the region during the 13th and 14th century, contains many remains of Wats (temples) which inturn contain many “Chedis” and “Buddhas”, many of the ruins are ruined but some are in very good shape and you can make out how majestic they were in their time. The old city is surrounded by a series of large moats and walls, in a near perfect square. The prime Wats are mainly in the center, but outside the walls there are a few gems.
Take a look for yourself:
Cruisin'

Cruisin'

Chedi is big pointy thing, remeber that.

Chedi is big pointy thing, remember that.

The main Wat in center of park

The main Wat in center of park

Me again

Me

Buddha

Buddha

Me

Me again

My guest house is a nice quiet place, a little ways out of town. I am staying in a bungalow for the first time since it was only $10. Only problem I had was with the creature that scratched at my roof at 4am. I had to tell myself that it wasn’t going to get through and fall into the room. It also sounded as if it was being chased around and at one point seemed to be crying.  Now back on more of the normal tourist route, I met a few people from places. On the bus ride out to park, I talked to a nice couple from England. They were staying at the same guest house as I.  On the bus ride back, a friendly solo traveler who has lived the past 5 years in Ashland, OR. He is trying to find work in Thailand. Good chats.

Monday, Si Satchanalai Historical Park:  The lesser known and visited site, the place is about 57km north of Sukhothai and requires you to catch a bus heading north and request a dropoff. Plans worked out and I was dropped at the park entrance along with a jolly German couple, whom I enjoyed chatting with during certain walks. I did rent a bike when we got to one section, but the park can be done on foot. There are a few Wats outside the city walls that really aren’t required viewing. Brief History: I don’t really know, I think the same time frame as the last place, just not as large or important. Much more of a park like feel, with very few other people and venders. Most of the time I had the Wats to myself, which made for a very enjoyable viewing experience. I hope these photos portray that:

Bike

Bike

a Wat

a Wat

looking down, imagine a roof

looking down

a good one

a good one

You can see the one other tourist at this Wat

You can see the one other tourist at this Wat

Clothing is not the original from 13th century

Clothing is not the original from 13th century

Zie Germans, did not rent a bike but I ran into them multiple times throughout the park. We waited about an hour at the bus stop together, for a ride back to Sukhothai. Thay have been to Thailand 10 times, yet still find new places to explore. I enjoyed the past 2 days very much and was glad to see sites other than the more common and recently built city Wats.

Currently in my pocket, I have a bus ticket to BKK with a 22:40 departure. The trip is 7 hours, which should line up good to catch another bus out to Kanchanaburi (3 hours west). I can get a good chunk of traveling out of the way during the dark hours, and have a floating raft room reserved for Tuesday night (still just $10). So, I am headed back into the mountains and waterfalls for 2 nights before I meet my friends SalazMeyer in the “Venice of the East”. บน ท้อง ถนน อีก ครั้ง

Different Names for the Same Thing

Sunday, November 22nd, 2009

Now, I know that all of you have been on pins and needles, waiting to hear about my adventure into Myanmar (Burma). But, my plans did not come to fruition, which all shall be explained in this semi-interesting story.

Saturday: I have discovered a new alarm, I was awakened by the playing of the national anthem at 6:50am. After the music, a womans voice comes on and words are said for what seems like another 10 minutes. Maybe it was the location of my guest house, possibly right next to a speaker, but it was loud. An early wake up was in the plans anyways, so I proceeded with my day as scheduled: Stroll to bus station, check on departure to next town, mosey back to guesthouse, check out, and store backpack.

As I was checking out, the owner of the place (a Thai teacher) asked me where I was from. Upon hearing that I came from the U.S.A., a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district, she politely asked if I could tutor one of her students. They had a big Spelling Bee tomorrow and she would really appreciate a native english speakers help. I told her that I wanted to make a run to the border, but could postpone it a few hours. So, I grabbed a bag of breakfast noodles from the market and returned to the house. The student showed up a few minutes later, and I was handed this list of Spelling Bee words:

The List

The List

There were actually 2 lists, each with over 200 words. I basically just tried to read the words as clearly as I could, and watch to see if she wrote them down correctly. The student was in the 10th grade, I think, and had much better handwriting than myself. She cruised on some words, probably the ones that she remebered from past sessions, and others were a struggle. The biggest difficulty was hearing which vowel to put in and especially how to finish words that end in “tion”, “sion”, or “ious”. It was a good learning experience for both of us, and a chance for me to talk a lot after a quiet past couple days.

After all the spelling, the Teacher also thought that one of the rounds would be “fill in the blank”. I told her this would be impossible, imagine a Thai person trying to fill in the following sentence: “Discrimination of any sort is ___ in a civilized society.” Answer: Abhorrent. Yep, How do you define abhorrent to a Thai 10th grader? I barely know what it means, but the teacher tried to define every word in the sentence above to the student. I humored her for a bit, but opted to just read some more words and create my own phrases. Mostly using my goto one “The Man/Woman was ___”.

The teacher told me that their current English instructors are getting on in years and that they could use a handsome, intelligent, and elloquent speaking man, like myself. (That is not word for word, her english was a little broken so I had to assume some things) My initial thought “Me teach English, that’s unpossible”. But, I gave her my email address, so we shall see what happens.

Part of me wonders whether I, Micah, should be teaching English to others. Let’s be honest and put it all on the table: English was not my best subject in school, I can barely understand it, I rarely read anything other than sports stories, and my pronunciation leaves much to be desired. I know I butchered a few words while reciting them to her, and even skipped many so as not to irreparably damage this young mind. With all of that, if the offer comes, I will have some thinking to do.

The clock struck noon, and the lesson ended. Discussing my border plans further with Teach, a Visa concern came up and she made some calls. Upon return to Thailand from Maynmar, tourists receive a 15 day extension. I have 21 days left on my 60 day visa, and 3 weeks to go. The lady on the phone made it seem that my 60 day would be nulled and I would be left with the 15 day they give me, leaving me short of my departure day. I don’t know the truth, but considered this a possible outcome. Plus, I worried about having time to catch my ride east. Thus, the husband of the Teach drove me to the border, so that I could see the “Friendship Bridge” and what lies across it, then dropped me off at the Bus terminal.

From there: lots of waiting, squeezing my legs into the minivan, going through checkpoints, and finally arriving in Sukhothai for supper. Also, I had a realization that it is good to be a man of average height and weight, and no longer dream of having an NBA or NFL type body. Travel like this would be near impossible (although if I was rich, I could roll in style). So, to all those kids out there, work with what you got. If you are short: travel is easy and you can get into the McDonald’s playland ball room. Tall and hairy: you can get into R movies and buy alchohol. Average height and looks: well, we just tend to blend into the crowd and thus can get away with minor looting during riots. ไป ลูก ๆ ของ ฉัน ด้วย การ ให้ ความ สุข ของ ฉัน

Livin’ On The Edge

Friday, November 20th, 2009

I knew that the 6 hr sorng-taa-ou ride from Mae Sariang to Mae Sot, while hugging the border with Myanmar (Burma), would be interesting, but was happy to learn all of the reasons why.

Picture me rollin

Picture me rollin

Friday morning, I boarded the open-air bus at the station with only 2 other passengers, and began the long journey. Random pickups and dropoffs were constantly made, and we even accepted cargo, such as a motorbike and 6 banana tree trunks.

The most interesting passengers: a group of about 15 school children (roughly 10 years old) that piled onto the back, most just grasping the outside rail. While the driver slowed for their stop, one of them actually fell off. I think he was expecting the driver to stop sooner and released his grip prematurely. I just heard the noise and turned to see him face down on the gravel. He slowly got up, looked at his elbow, and dusted himself off. One of his friends paid his fare for him and went back to check his status. He was able to walk away but seemed a little confused.

The views were always stunning, as we climbed passes and dipped through valleys. We cruised through numerous small farming villages, where the driver would honk multiple times to alert all to his presence. The most fascinating section was a 3 km stretch past the largest Burmese refugee camp in Thailand, called Mae La.

Best one I could get

Best one I could get

It has an estimated population of about 60,000 who have been displaced by the ongoing civil war across the border. We were constantly going through military check points armed machine gun carrying soldiers, but I wasn’t expecting to see the thousands of huts lining the valley. A loose barbed wire fence acts as the barrier to the road, while the other side is protected by a rather steep range of cliffs. There have been threats of violence to this site made by the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA) as recently as this past July.

I was the only passenger who made the full trek and estimate that we had roughly 50 different passengers throughout the full run. My current city, Mae Sot, almost feels like another country. The look of the town and the people is drastically different than any other place I have visited. The local market is vibrant and diverse, due to the large number of Burmese residents. It was a shame I had just eaten.

I did not sample

I did not sample

Market

Market

And, the few Wats in town actually showed me some things I hadn’t seen before.

He seems content

I know the feeling

The city is about 57 km south of the refugee camp and is home to many NGO workers. Being only about 7 km away from the border, I am going to attempt to cross over tomorrow. Don’t worry Mom, it is an open route that many tourist take to renew their visas. I will be going to take advantage of the 1 day access they allow, just so that I can say I have been there. To be safe, I will leave my soap box at the guest house and avoid any large lively gatherings of people. ทำให้ รัก ไม่ใช่ สงคราม

Say Hello Wave Goodbye

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

I am now in the middle of my 5 towns in 5 nights tour of NW Thailand.  Briefly back to being an attration to the locals, I am enjoying the time away from the big cities and getting waves and hellos as I walk down the street. The following is a rundown of the past 2 days in the life of Micah.

Mae Hong Son: The ride in from Pai was stimulating, as we crossed 2 mountain passes and enjoyed stunning views of the valleys. The prize of the town is Wat Phra That Doi Kong Mu, a temple complex on top of a hill that overlooks the town.

Mae Hong Son

Mae Hong Son

photo

photo

It was another long hike up, but this time I was able use a finely crafted set of brick stairs and inclines.  There were a handful of other Wats for me to explore as well as a night market set up on the main streets. One Wat was just across a pond from my guest house and gets lit up at night (like most tourists, but in a different way).

Wat Mai Chom Khang

Wat Mai Chom Khang

I had plans to wake up early the next day, and climb back up to the Wat on the hill. But went back to sleep, when I saw that there was no fog around to provide me what Lonely Planet had described. One last note: the few Farang I have seen, have been middle aged, possibly Dutch, and seem to move in herds.

Mae Sariang: The towns get smaller, less touristy, and more peaceful. I almost wish I had more time and less to see, that way I could spend another day here just sitting by the river.  My room at the guest house, though small, opens up to a deck overhanging the river. Plus, it has been the least expensive of my trip.

My place is the white deck on the right.

My place is the white deck on the right.

Not much else to do here, which is fine by me. All of these towns serve as jumping off points for guided treks into the jungle. I have opted against spending a day and the money to do such a thing. Although, I will not rule out the possibility of partaking down south.

Now, off to find supper and possibly some more light reading by the river. And by the way Lucas, I am enjoying it but have only gotten about 120 pages down so far. It took me a while to get used to the names and achieve the concentration necessary for such writing. Hope life is treating you all better than it should. รู้สึก ง่าย สงบ สุข

The Long and Winding Road

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

Reporting from Pai, Thailand:

I arrived here Monday, hearing that this was the the party town for foreigners up in the mountains. But I also heard that the scenery was breathtaking and the waterfalls, refreshing. The later is what I was searching for, and found.

Tired from my hiking on Sunday and the van ride out, my first afternoon was spent briefly walking the city. After finding a dirty blue guest house close to a main drag, I took in a few Wats and small street markets, sat down for a bite to eat, and had a Chang.  The rest of the night was spent planning my next day and next week of travels.

a photo

a photo

Tuesday, I rented a bicycle so that I could get to where I wanted to go. I passed on the motorbikes that everyone gets due to environmental concerns, exercise, and the fact I was scared.

The first trip was the most grueling ride of my life, all uphill about 10 km one way. I made stops to see another Wat and some rock that all the Thai tourist where getting their picture taken in front of. Mo Paeng waterfall was my final destination and it was worth it. Not really for its size or beauty, but more for the many pools available for swimming.

Beaver Dam

Beaver Dam

Above: I was able to capture this shot of my human body fully engulfed in one of the rapids. All of my pains from the ride were washed away.  I spent almost 2 hours exploring every pool before the highly enjoyable ride back down to town.

Back in town, I proceeded up the other side of the valley to check out a Wat on a hill. Wat Phra That Mae Yen was a short ride from and then 356 steps, which I chose over biking up the road. On top, a nice panoramic view of the city and a decent temple, I had mostly to myself.

Pai is on the right

Pai is on the right

Lounging Buddha

Lounging Buddha

An ice cream cone helped me through the walk back down the stairs and gave me the energy to try to find another waterfall. Although I turned down the wrong road and didn’t see the falls, I enjoyed the ride. I doubt my legs could have gotten me up there anyways. Discovering my directional error, I turned around and headed back to town, returned my bicycle, and sat down at an eMac in a store called Apple Pai, to write these words.

I don’t think I will be able to walk tomorrow, so it is a good thing I have a bus lined up to take me to Mae Hong Son in the morning. Another mountain town, about 120 km SW of Pai, I hope to find more waterfalls and peace. A bid you all “la-gon and chok dee”. นิยาย เกี่ยว กับ วีรชน ต่อ


500 Miles

Sunday, November 15th, 2009

(by IPod = photos added in post-production)
In Chiang Mai, i’m staying at a nice, cheap place called Thapae Gate Lodge. Walking distance to everything, and walk I did.

Saturday: decided to change my food up a little and ate at Mike’s Burgers. Classic diner style place, I had the bacon cheeseburger and some tasty fries. From there I began my Wat (temple) treck through the city. A lot of golden framed buildings with sizable Buddha statues, front and center.

I have always been a fan of cathedrals and temples, due to the quiet and beauty. Everbody respectfully admires the art and religion. I feel a little weird taking pictures while someone is on their knees praying, but try not to disturb them.

IMG_0128

Wat Phra Singh was my favorite, with multiple structures and gardens. While there, a female student from the university asked to have a 5min conversation with me, an English speaker. She had a helper with her and there was only one question I couldn’t understand. Glad to help, but I had to refrain from using my normal slang and curse words.

After all the Wats, I headed to the local mall. My camera has been wild’n out so I bought a Canon A100 IS. No bargain since I was in a mall, but I like it. I did a little post purchase celebrating by hiting the Saturday night street market. A series of food stalls provided supper while I walked and eyed the goods.

Sunday: Caught a bus up to Doi Suthep National Park, home of Wat Phra That. 306 decorated steps up to see good city views and many intricate statues. Children dancing for Baht in front of temple, kind of sour the scene.

IMG_0063

IMG_0083

Bus dropped me at entrance to Nam Tok Monthathon (a waterfall) where a 3 km hike up the road was rewarded with a place to cool my feet.

IMG_0094

Hiking up even more, revealed a series of pools, rock slides, and frolicking locals. I did one unintentional slide which amused them. After an easier stroll back down to the main road, I waited for a bus to drive by.

More waiting and some drivebys, I decided to strut my stuff. One advantage, I got to visit a few more falls on the way. During all of this trekking, I had the Peter, Paul, and Mary song “500 Miles” in my head. Luckily, a local motorbiker gave me a free lift the last few km back into town.

I proceeded to cruise the Sunday night street market. Even bigger than Saturdays, this new area has more streets involved and some Wats. Another night with a random supper, local crafts, and street music.

Normally they play Thai songs, but while passing one musician on guitar, I swore I heard “500 Miles”. I figured my dehydrated mind was deceiving me, until the words came. Sure enough, my theme song for the day was being beautifully sung to me on the streets of Chiang Mai. I hadn’t heard any other recognizable songs the past 2 nights, my trip has now been blessed.

Tomorrow morning I hop a minivan to Pai and the mountains. I am ok with cities but look forward to the views. Also, I will attempt my first walk up hostel booking. It is fully on.

Halfway Home

Friday, November 13th, 2009

I think this is the official midpoint of my trip and today I dug my last ditch. Tomorrow, I cruise into Chiang Mai and become a full time tourist. Many temples await but first let me recap my stay here with this interpretive dance I did.

HPIM2985

I’m not sure if the link will work so I will also add these words and pictures:

Host spent only 3 nights here during my week stay, which was nice. Us WWOOFers were left to hold down the fort and once entertained a young Aussie couple. Many movies, cards, and bottles of Chang during the long periods of darkness. It is odd to have the weather so perfect and yet the sun is gone before 6pm.

Chang

Chang

Very fun group, very good food, and lots of weeding fill the days. I try to speak some French with Jerry Lewis but all I know is from Pink Martini songs. Although, “Je Ne Veux Pas Travailler” turned out to be quite fitting. I apologized to them for Britney Spears and they apologized for Jean Claude Van Damme.

I’ve taken a few more bike rides and mostly just relaxed.

My nap sack on my back

My nap-sack on my back

Our trip today took us through a small town, very peaceful. We stopped at a local shop to get ice cream, Jerry Lewis is addicted to the interesting snacks these Thai shops sell.

Jerry Lewis on bikes

Jerry Lewis on bikes

Some other jobs I’ve done can be seen below:

We got the good stuff out of some passion fruit for the Juice bar.

One for me, one for the pot.

One for me, one for the pot.

I dug up some land for the planting that was to come.

Don't sweat the technique

Don't sweat the technique

A few shots of the farm:

Part of the farm

Some rows

It soon will spread its wings and fly

It soon will spread its wings and fly

Sunset

Sunset

I added more pics this post, since the rest of my blog updates will be via my Ipod and Internet shops. I am excited about what is to come and looking forward to heading up into the mountains. With a very tentative plan in place, I head west, where the towns are small and the scenery should be breathtaking. ด้านตะวันตกเป็นด้านที่ดีที่สุด

The Next Chapter

Monday, November 9th, 2009

I am currently at my next farm, about an hour north of Chiang Mai, here is what you have missed:

13 hr night train ride from BKK. Sleeper train full, window seat next to cockroach family (insects on wall, not meant as racial slur) = no sleep. Met up with the Brit from previous farm, long bus/delivery van ride to farm.

One of many stops

One of many stops

About the farm: New Host has 2 restaurants back in town and a floating cottage on reservior where people pay to stay. Nice wood house, good rooms and beds since some tourists stay here before going out to cottage. Wifi, DVDs, help yourself bar (pricey), cooks, and cleaners. Some Thai farm workers.
Farm is far more developed than previous, most food for us and eateries is picked here. The meals are great with fresh mushrooms every meal that grow in a special room. So far: i’ve been turning dirt, composting, weeding around asparagus, and making strawberry planters out of coconut.  Also, catfish in pond i have tried to catch, but only got one crab. Brit caught 3 fish, fried, we ate for supper.

In rod we trust

In rod we trust

People: Host is retired British military, looks tough, very laid back. Hostess is Thai and stays in town during week to work at their food places. The Brit you already know, he has been traveling and drinking a lot since he left the last farm. He is leaving Wednesday to head back to BKK. 2 girls from Belguim also here WWOOFing, speak French and decent English, fun and good workers, I will refer to them as Jerry Lewis. And I, who will be here until Saturday. After that I go where the buses take me.

Sunday was a day off, so the Brit and I biked around a little then picked up Jerry Lewis and headed to the reservoir. In Srilanna National Park, the area is beautiful and hilly. A nice change from the relatively flat Bang Phra. We swam off some rocks and jumped off a floating dock house.

Quantum Leap

Quantum Leap

I love being away from it all in this very small farming community, with just one small store a 40 minute crab walk away. We take photos of every sunset, weather is perfect, and it’s quiet. A guy could get used to this. ชีวิตของเกษตรกรเป็นง่ายหนึ่ง